The Body in Irish History

The Body in Irish History

This week, we consider how the body has been represented in Irish culture and society throughout history. From the Great Famine, through the revolutionary period, and into the censored society of the independent state, the body has been starved, threatened, weaponized, and repressed. We look at how W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and Eavan Boland reassess the body in Irish history. Professor Declan Kiberd will be joined by art historian Dr. Eimear O’Connor during the live discussion.

Pre-Readings

Presented by Declan Kiberd

From Famine to Revival

Presented by Declan Kiberd

In this segment, Professor Declan Kiberd discusses how Irish attitudes towards the body after the Great Famine were marked by a sense of distrust in nature. He cites the Irish Revival as a turning point in attitudes towards the body and sexuality.

"Crazy Jane talks with the Bishop"

Presented by Declan Kiberd

Declan looks at the use of the female voice in the Gaelic tradition.

Molly’s Soliloquy

Presented by Declan Kiberd

In this clip, Declan talks about the fusion of body and soul in Molly Bloom’s soliloquy at the end of “Ulysses” by James Joyce.

Join the Live Virtual Event

Presented by Declan Kiberd

Ask questions and listen to a live discussion with Professor Declan Kiberd on Wednesday, August 19, at 1 pm EDT.  Register to receive information about how to join the live event.

Please view this look book with images that Professor Kiberd will be referencing in his lecture and discussion.

The special guest during our live event will be Dr. Éimear O’Connor.

Dr. O’Connor, HRHA, is an art historian, curator, lecturer, advisor, and archivist. She was born and lives in Dublin, Ireland. O’Connor began her professional career as a visual artist and has exhibited in Ireland, Denmark, and North America. She is author of “Seán Keating: Art, Politics and Building the Irish Nation” (2013). Her forthcoming book, “Art, Ireland, and the Irish Diaspora. Chicago, Dublin, New York: Culture, Connections and Controversies,” will be published in September by Irish Academic Press.

Prepare for Next Week

Presented by Declan Kiberd

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