Thinking with Newman – Educating with Intention Today

In 1852, John Henry Newman presented a series of lectures examining three matters of higher education: the nature of knowledge, the role of religious belief, and the importance of a broad, liberal education for university students. These lectures, presented in Dublin at his University Church, became the basis of Newman’s life work, "The Idea of a University." This lecture examines Newman's book and its contemporary relevance in the face of today's challenges in the education and formation of young people.
May 26, 2024

Top 10 Learning Moments

  1. The two things that I think are most important in Newman’s educational writings are, first of all, that knowledge is precious, that knowledge all by itself is a treasure, and that all knowledge forms one whole. — Mary Katherine Tillman
  2. The sole aim of liberal arts education is the enlargement of mind. Nothing else. — Mary Katherine Tillman
  3. There is no proxy, even if you are sitting six feet apart with a mask on, for face-to-face connection. — Adam Kronk
  4. Catholic universities are still trying very hard to legitimize themselves in a secular society. — Fr. Tyson
  5. I do think there are challenges to maintaining a fruitful balance between fidelity to a Catholic mission and committing to be a great research university. — Kathleen Sprows Cummings
  6. Another big challenge that I see, not only at my home institution but many places, is how to balance maintaining an authenticity to the founding charisms of the congregation and also empowering the lay people to become leaders. — Kathleen Sprows Cummings
  7. Students want to feel like they are a part of something larger than themselves. They crave that. — Kathleen Sprows Cummings
  8. The crisis actually tests the strategic plan and ambitions. The place where strategic plans and mission statements actually come into play is in the crisis. Institutions can bend, buckle, or blossom in crisis. — Daire Keogh
  9. Young people particularly crave human interaction. They are incredibly social, and I think that ultimately, when we come out of this, students will want more in terms of engagement rather than less. — Daire Keogh
  10. Notre Dame teaches students to be lifelong learners and global servants.

Interested in learning more?

This series is hosted by ThinkND, the University of Notre Dame’s online learning community that connects you with videos, podcasts, articles, courses, and other resources to inspire minds and spark conversations on everything from faith and politics to science, technology, and your career.

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Featured Speakers

Rev. Gary Chamberland, C.S.C., Director of the Notre Dame Newman Centre for Faith and Reason

Kevin Whelan, Michael Smurfit Director of the Notre Dame Dublin Global Gateway

Rev. Gerard J. Olinger, C.S.C., Vice President for Mission Engagement and Church Affairs at the University of Notre Dame

Rev. Dave Tyson, C.S.C., President of Holy Cross College

Kathleen Sprows Cummings, Director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism

Aisling MacRunnels, Chief Business and Growth Officer at Synack

Professor Dáire Keogh, President of Dublin City University

Dr. Thomas Greene, University of Portland Provost Emeritus

Rachel Ingal, Notre Dame Student Body President

“Another big challenge that I see, not only at my home institution but many places, is how to balance maintaining an authenticity to the founding charisms of the congregation and also empowering the lay people to become leaders.”

— Kathleen Sprows Cummings
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