Perspectives on COVID-19 and the Common Good

How do we protect and serve those who are most vulnerable in our society right now? Who are the most vulnerable members? What does it look like to practice physical distancing instead of social distancing? Our panel of experts ranging from the fields of medicine, labor, global health, and theology tackle these questions and more as they relate to the common good in light of the current global pandemic. The common good relates to the flourishing of each and every person in society and if even one person is left without their basic necessities to flourish, the good of everyone is diminished. The good news is there can be a hopeful opportunity in this era to learn where the systemic vulnerabilities in our society exist and transform structures and institutions accordingly.

In addition, the panel is available as a video recording.

Dr. Mark Fox is the Associate Dean and Director of the Indiana University School of Medicine- South Bend, Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at IU School of Medicine South Bend, Adjunct Professor at the School of Public Health IU-South Bend, Adjunct Faculty in Theology at Notre Dame, and Deputy Health Officer for St. Joseph County.

Professor Margie Pfeil is a Faculty joint appointment in Theology and the Center for Social Concerns, Faculty Fellow for the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies, and co-founder of the St. Peter Claver Catholic Worker community in South Bend.

Dr. Bernard Nahlen is the Director of the Eck Institute for Global Health at Notre Dame.

Brigid Kelly is the spokesperson and communications director for the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 700.

Center for Social Concerns
About the Podcast:

The Signs of the Times Podcast presented by the Center of Social Concerns discusses principles of human dignity, solidarity with the marginalized, and the common good as they relate to current events.

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April 24, 2020

Health and SocietyReligion and PhilosophyMargie PfeilMark FoxCoronavirusCOVID-19The Signs of the TimesCatholic Social TeachingBernard NahlenCenter for Social ConcernsClemens SedmakPovertySocial Justice